Make us your home page
Instagram

Going green

  1. Thanks to Hurricane Irma, you need a boat to get to Shell Key again

    Water

    AT THE SHELL KEY PRESERVE — From a boat puttering along in the water, the sandy beach seems to go on and on. Then, abruptly, it ends at a mass of tangled, overturned mangroves where a great blue heron sits on an exposed root.

  2. Bill to ban orca breeding filed in House faces pushback from SeaWorld

    Wildlife

    A bill that would outlaw the breeding and performing of killer whales in Florida has cleared the initial hurdle that kept it off the table last year: getting a lawmaker to file it in the first place.

  3. Pumping sewage underground is illegal. St. Pete wants it legal.

    Water

    ST. PETERSBURG — The city wants the state to change its environmental rules to make legal an illegal maneuver it has relied on a lot lately: flushing wastewater down into the aquifer.

  4. Temple Terrace to celebrate Arbor Day on Jan. 20

    Environment

    TEMPLE TERRACE — When the spreading live oak in Woodmont Park first appeared, the country itself had just sprouted. If the estimation of the tree's age is accurate, it was there when George Washington was president.

  5. Video: Naples man attacked by bear as he walked dog

    Wildlife

    A Naples man is recovering after he was attacked by a black bear at his apartment complex Wednesday night.

  6. Bowen: Dumping brings sloppy start to the new year

    Environment

    We're slobs.

    That is a logical conclusion after a recent mile-long walk along the road right of way fronting the western edge of the Cypress Creek Preserve in Land O' Lakes.

  7. Alligators use bizarre, and creepy, ancient ritual to survive North Carolina's arctic blast

    Wildlife

    A North Carolina swamp park has posted a video explaining how alligators survive in a frozen pond, and it's both creepy and bizarre.

  8. Red Tide and speeding boats blamed for manatee deaths topping 500 in 2017

    Wildlife

    ST. PETERSBURG — Red Tide algae blooms and speeding boaters helped push manatee deaths in Florida to 538 in 2017, the third highest total on record, according to figures compiled by the state's Fish and Wildlife Research Institute.

  9. High-risk underground fuel tanks in Florida await cleanup as state spends millions on easy fixes

    Water

    Scattered across Florida are 19,000 underground petroleum storage tanks that are no longer in use and may be leaking into the aquifer, the state's drinking water supply.

  10. Low oxygen levels, coral bleaching getting worse in oceans

    Water

    WASHINGTON — Global warming is making the world's oceans sicker, depleting them of oxygen and harming delicate coral reefs more often, two studies show.